We applaud any leader's commitment to an improved work environment for their employees, and recognize the huge investment that this commitment can take. Since the heating, cooling and air quality of a building can play such a major factor in a happy and productive environment, we wanted to provide you with some simple mid-year maintenance tips to make sure your commercial and industrial HVAC systems are in check.  Below you can find some recommendations from Ryan King and Mike Bess, members of the Cambridge customer service team.

  1. Check the air filters.  Clean these filters if necessary because dirty filters will reduce CFM and could damage the discharge air sensor. 
  2. Grease the bearings.  The grease should be evenly distributed around the race; however, do not use the standard bearing grease in the Baldor motor.  This motor takes special grease that can be referred to in the technical manual.
  3. Check the belt tension and inspect for wear.  If the belt is too tight, it can  prematurely wear out the bearings and the belt.  If the belt is too loose it can slip or squeal.  
  4. Cycle the unit on and off in all modes of operation.  This ensures things are working per specifications.
  5. Check the discharge temperature.  Use a wired thermistor at the mixing box and calibrate the system if necessary.
  6. Inspect the control panels.  Look for any loose or frayed wire connections and make sure all connections are tight.  
  7. Check and clean the evaporator and condenser coils.  Dirty coils will drastically reduce cooling equipment efficiency and strain the compressor. 
  8. Perform a gas valve leak test.  This verifies the integrity of the valves.
  9. Verify that the manifold differential gas pressure matches the nameplate.  It is extremely important that this is set up properly.  If the manifold pressure is incorrect, the heater temp rises and its efficiency will be affected.  
  10. Inspect direct evaporative media (CELdek).  Ensure that there is proper water flow across the media. 
  11. Check the calibration of digital thermostats.  Press the up arrow and hold it; the display should show 0F.  If not, the calibration may have been adjusted to show a warmer or cooler temperature than desired.

We know you’re busy, and sometimes the easiest way to get direction on a service question or instructions on how to install can best be obtained by a quick “How-To” video. For that reason, we’ve compiled some service videos that you can view at your convenience that may help you with a Start Up or troubleshoot a problem you may be experiencing.

As always, our service team is happy to assist you with any questions you may have. Please call us at (888) 976-4451or email: service_dept@cambridge-eng.com

 

“Comfort” is an interesting word that we use a lot at Cambridge.  Since we are an HVAC company, it is usually in context with making sure the people in your industrial facility are breathing fresh, tempered air, or making sure that your employees in high-bay buildings aren’t freezing in the dead of winter. There’s also “comfort” in the realm of making sure your employees know that you’ve got their backs and have a genuine interest in their personal health and professional growth.  (see blogs on Dale Carnegie Leadership Training and Stretching Your Way to Workplace Safety to generate ideas of how to boost comfort both personally and professionally).
 

Still, most companies overlook the importance of physical employee comfort, and are losing real talent and real opportunity to grow with those employees when they leave to pursue a workplace that can meet and exceed their basic requirements of a healthy working environment.
 

Not convinced? Here are four reasons that we think will back us up.
 

Safety protocol alone is reason enough.

According to OSHA – your workers have the right to working conditions that do not pose a risk of serious harm.  The OSHA website starts with a dire warning: “The quality of indoor air inside … workplaces is important not only for workers' comfort but also for their health. Poor indoor air quality (IAQ) has been tied to symptoms like headaches, fatigue, trouble concentrating, and irritation of the eyes, nose, throat and lungs.” This safety protocol is actually far, far above a “comfort” suggestion – and could be downright dangerous if ignored.
 

And even though we could stop after the safety reason, here are three more reasons to consider:
 

You can’t exist without them.

Unless you are a completely automated company or self-employed, you depend on at least one employee to get your product or service sold, produced, billed, you name it. Employees know that they have employment options – especially in trade professions, where there is a serious labor shortage. Don’t doubt that even if an employee feels fairly compensated, they might still leave because of continuing discomfort in their workspace.
 


 

Continuous improvement falls apart when it’s not the priority.

Imagine a humid July day in a distribution facility, when you can’t imagine doing anything but cooling off. We spend a portion of every day identifying opportunities for lean improvement in our processes and workspaces, but even we know that these can fall by the wayside when it is just too hot or too cold.
 

They are your brand ambassadors.

Client services to your customer.

Seasoned laborers to new hires.

Any employee to the world on social media.

Your employees can and should be your biggest advocates, because they are treated right (and physical comfort plays a big role) and believe in your product or service. The opposite of these two things can destroy every sales opportunity on your books this year.

There are so many ways to make your team feel comfortable – and they deserve it, so make it a priority to figure out the right investment to provide them a workspace in which they can reach their full potential.

Cambridge is excited to offer our M-Series Makeup Air Unit with Cooling technologies! Our M-series products are used to provide both non-conditioned and cooled demand controlled ventilation and exhaust replenishment in both commercial and industrial buildings and facilities. Cambridge M-Series Make-Up-Air units can provide up to 75,000 CFM of air, 140 tons of DX cooling / 250 tons of Hydronic cooling and evaporative cooling as well. We also have a wide range of performance features that include:

  • Motorized Inlet or Discharge Damper
  • Dual Rain Hoods
  • V-Bank Filter Sections
  • High Efficiency Filters
  • Mounting Curbs and Stands
  • Variable Frequency Drives

Some of the applications where our M-Series products are used are:

Automotive Service and Repair facilities, Greenhouses, Restaurants, Sporting facilities, Foundries, Paint Booths, Waste Water Treatment plants, Manufacturing facilities Cambridge Engineering products are designed for simple installation, easy maintenance and reliable operation and they are available with certified and pre-engineered factory options and field-installed accessories. For more information on our Make-up-Air solutions click here to visit our website!

Did you know that part of the Cambridge package includes a free and customized recommendation on unit placement in your facility? Our experts Denny DeGreeff and Mark Struckmann offer up some tips to consider when planning for ultimate Indoor Air Quality and Comfort using commercial heaters.

4 TIPS FOR PLANNING YOUR COMMERCIAL HEATER LAYOUT 

1. Consider your facility layout.

Locate the heaters near the perimeter of the building, blowing towards the center. Due to the high velocity discharge of a Cambridge heater, you might be able to locate the heaters near a gas main to save on piping costs. 

2. Find your source of Heat Loss.

Place the units near largest source of heat loss, typically dock doors. This can eliminate the need for extra heating equipment such as infrared tubes and door heaters. Also, make sure the heat from your unit can reach the floor (Refer to the Typical Discharge Height Chart in your Engineering Spec manual as a guideline).

3. Note Obstructions.

You do not want to blow directly in to an obstruction such as a rack or interior wall.  If the racking layout allows, align the heater up with an aisle and blow lengthwise. 

4. Adapt the heater configuration to work for your space.

Cambridge heaters can be customized to almost any building structure and installation requirement. If you have limited space inside the building for heater install, consider a different type of configurations, such as a vertical or roof-top installation. 

When it comes to determining they types of Cambridge Engineering units that you would need to heat and ventilate your facility the answer is not always easy. You might have a small building with just basic heating needs. Or you might have a large facility that has mechanical exhaust and you need equipment that provides both exhaust replenishment and heating. Either way, knowing which products you need to provide the best indoor air quality for your facility is not always cut and dry. So take a minute and read over the infographic below.  It asks some very basics questions that can provide a general guide as to what Cambridge products are available to help you with your heating, ventilation and exhaust replenishment needs.   But don't stop here. Take the next step and engage our exceptional sales team who will work with you to determine the size and type of Cambridge units that you will need to meet your facilities requirements. Just visit us a www.cambridge-eng.com or click heres to schedule a meeting with our sales team.

For the facility’s unique processes and requirements, your team has designed and optimized every aspect of your operation. This optimization has become a minimum requirement for continued operation. But utilities and your HVAC systems are often thought of as ancillary systems. They become outdated and even neglected, despite this optimization of processes. For facility leaders, minimizing or eliminating any process interruption is always top of mind. And you must ensure that regulatory and safety requirements are met at all times. As a result of these and other operational pressures, you probably undertake frequent routine maintenance if you have an aging facility system. For you, these aging systems with like-for-like replacement lead to increased labor investment, higher operational costs, and shorter total system lifecycle. Production processes and technologies have changed Many facilities’ current boiler-driven process systems barely resemble their original design. Increasing the size of these systems to handle the heating requirements as well as the process loads added massive complexity and simply doesn’t make sense today. Instead of investing incrementally in an antiquated system, it is far more efficient financially and energy wise to take advantage of the dedicated system technology available today. Rather than continual reactive fixes, a proactive plan pays big dividends for the entire operation, from production efficiency, to air quality, comfort level, and more. By retrofitting your existing heating, ventilating, and process steam systems with right-sized and right-located dedicated systems, you can:

  • Reduce energy costs
  • Reduce maintenance costs
  • Reduce operating costs
  • Reduce asset replacement costs
  • Reduce system complexity

 Dedicated space heating is better  Dedicated direct-fired High Temperature Heating & Ventilating technologies like the Cambridge S-Series can provide the most cost-effective way to meet comfort requirements year round. With 20% to 70% energy savings, flexible installation configuration, and minimum operations interruption, these dedicated systems can be used to solve a myriad of problems. Dedicated makeup air is better  Dedicated direct-fired natural gas Outside Air Units (makeup air units) like the Cambridge M-Series provide extreme efficiency and effectiveness to solve complex building pressurization problems. Left unresolved, these pressure challenges could cause comfort, process, or indoor air quality problems. With full gas modulation and optional Variable Frequency Drives, the M-Series ranges from 1000 CFM to 100,000 CFM and 100MBH to 9000MBH, meeting the toughest of ventilation requirements. Once you have dedicated systems handling the space heating and ventilating loads, your team can concentrate on meeting the unique process needs with the most energy-efficient and code-compliant boiler. Additionally, since the process load has been isolated, you can run the boiler at a more consistent operating window, raising the efficiency even more. Minimizing the size of this unit significantly decreases maintenance cost and complexity with fewer steam traps, steam leaks, and miles of pipes to manage. By embracing cutting-edge dedicated systems technology, facility leaders can spend less initially to purchase and install right-sized boiler systems. Additionally, you will realize ROI quickly with lower energy consumption and operating costs, as well as longer system lifecycle.   For more information on our industrial retorfit solutions visit www.cambridge-eng.com/irg

Industrial facilities today don’t have to be new in order to be efficient

Leading facility owners and operators are retrofitting existing facilities into models of efficiency and sustainability. Industrial facility retrofits are investments in efficient technologies that span all facility systems, including lighting, facility envelope, and HVAC. While most facility owners still pursue single technology improvements, market leaders bundle together energy saving technologies in a more comprehensive approach to get deeper savings and greater lifecycle value.    

Challenges for facility leaders are complex

Facility leaders recognize that industrial retrofits are largely about managing risk. Each facility project is unique and distinctive. Implementing a retrofit while protecting the production capabilities within the operation creates high visibility and requires a very clearly defined plan. Minimizing and eliminating all business interruption is always a top priority. It is also essential to protect the organization and meet or exceed all regulatory mandates to ensure safety for people. Facilities leaders seek trusted advisors and working arrangements that are in sync with all regulatory guidelines for facility compliance. This complexity can result in a built-in resistance to efficiency retrofits and change. For this reason, facility retrofits are often conducted in a reactive versus a proactive mode. “Like-for-like” system replacements are the most expedient directive when reacting to a facility system failure or needed upgrade. However, with superior options available, these short-term decisions can result in not only higher upfront costs but also dramatically higher operational costs and shorter total lifecycle of systems selected.

Aging mechanical systems and equipment require asset-replacement planning

Various aging facilities systems drive more frequent routine maintenance and require more people resources to maintain, which increases operating cost. Aging facility assets are a reality. Planning for and developing a methodical aged asset replacement strategy requires leadership planning and trusted partner relationships in order to benefit from system expertise applicable to your unique facility requirements.

 Systems interdependence impacts scalability

Industrial facilities evolve over time to reflect the changing needs of growing industries, modern equipment and processes, and other economic trends. In many instances, current production systems and technologies barely resemble their original form. Their supporting systems are often overlooked. As production systems change, there is a direct interdependence to process loads and exhaust systems. When HVAC systems are overlooked, this can cause inadequate makeup air, negative pressure problems, cold spots, and overall poor comfort levels. Furthermore the infrastructures of these aged industrial facilities typically resemble single systems that serve multiple functions, thus hindering their ability to scale their production rapidly and efficiently. Facility leaders are left with difficult decisions when incremental changes in production capacity become less cost-effective because of inadequate, interdependent systems. Facility leaders have many reasons to seek functional expertise and consultation to build proactive plans:
  • The need to meet or exceed corporate energy reduction mandates
  • To exceed production capacity metrics
  • In order to provide labor with ideal environment conditions: people comfort, productivity, and facility thermal condition requirements
  • To meet all facility safety regulations

Facility HVAC systems support improved process and production capacity

Facility leaders considering industrial retrofits of HVAC systems recognize the value of:
  • Rapid ROI – multi-level corporate approvals
  • System reliability and durability
  • Lifecycle cost
  • Standardization for proactive management and metrics
  • Integration with building automation systems
  • Complementing production and process applications of HVAC systems
I hope you find this blog topic interesting and would love to hear your feedback and comments on the subject. Be sure and visit our website at www.cambridge-eng.com to learn more about Cambridge Engineering.

Here is a short 2 minute and 30 second video about 3 available options on Cambridge Engineering's Make Up Air Units. Watch the video to learn about our Modulating Gas Controls, Variable Frequency Drives and Automated Profile Damper controls. Thanks for watching.

As our clients navigate HVAC system design for high bay facilities such as distribution centers or industrial manufacturing plants, they are often asked to recommend a design that accomplishes 3 key deliverables. 1.) Meet variable ventilation requirements 2.) Meet heating requirements / (Consider air load and conductive load and comfort requirements) 3.) Evaluate redundancy to eliminate production and/or service interruptions Warehouse As a manufacturer of high efficiency heating technologies (S-Series, SA-Series, Infrared) and ventilating technologies (M-Series, M-Series w/Cooling) we first seek understanding regarding how the building will be operated in order to recommend a heating platform, a ventilation platform, or both. While the core technologies are both 100% outside air, direct fired gas heaters, there are differences in system performance that will impact EE (energy efficiency), thermal comfort, and system installation cost. When there is a high level of CFM being exhausted due to processes inside a manufacturing facility, making up that building air loss with mechanical ventilation or inbound CFM is critical to balancing the air load of the building. Direct Fired Make-Up air systems with variable air flow capabilities utilizing a Variable Frequency Drive help to ensure better indoor air quality, better thermal comfort, and in some cases reduce safety incidents caused by negative environments and back drafts with non-powered combustion devices. When high CFM needs are identified (VENTILATION DRIVEN APPLICATION) due to process exhaust in either a manufacturing facility or distribution facility, engineers will first seek to design a VENTILATION (M-Series) system to bring the building to a neutral or balanced position with proper relief. According to the International Mechanical Code and the International Fuel Gas Code Section 611.7 Relief opening - The design of the installation shall include provisions to permit non-recirculating direct-fired industrial air heaters to operate at rated capacity without over-pressurizing the space served by the heaters by taking into account the structure’s designed infiltration rate, providing properly designed relief openings or an interlocked power exhaust system, or a combination of these methods. Depending on the application, achieving a neutral or even slightly positive pressure can be advantageous to keep natural infiltration in check and to avoid severe over pressurization, or adding to the required air load in the building. ANSI/ASHRAE Standards 62.1 is the recognized standard for minimum ventilation rates to meet acceptable Indoor Air Quality. As the complexity of a building’s air load increases with variable exhaust due to intermittent processes, variable ventilation solutions are required to maintain fresh air and neutral to slightly positive pressure in the building. Now that the ventilation is addressed in this high CFM building scenario, the designer then seeks to understand the heat load of the building and evaluate if the ventilation solution carries enough BTUS to cover heat requirements on design days. The warehouse or manufacturing facility in this case is built to FIRST satisfy the ventilation requirement and then “stack” any supplemental heating technologies to cover the heat load (air load + conductive load = total heat load.) In order to maximize efficiency, the designer can utilize a low CFM, high BTU heating technology to build the comprehensive system if the ventilation technology does not deliver the needed BTUs on design days for that particular city or location. In this scenario, designers would utilize the M-Series ventilating and heating technology and consider supplementing with S-Series (low CFM, high BTU) heaters if necessary to deliver efficiently, any remaining BTUS required. When there is not a significant process call for CFM or ventilation beyond basic ASHRAE 62.1 requirements for indoor air quality, High Temperature Heating and Ventilating (HTHV) technologies like the Cambridge S-Series offer the most effective solution. These offer the highest btu/cfm outputs of any make up air technology in the industry. In a HEATING DRIVEN APPLICATION, the designers seek to understand the heat load for the building and design a system that accounts for infiltration and brings the building to neutral, but does not over pressurize the building again addressing proper relief per the IFGC. This leads me to my last deliverable. Reliability and redundancy of ventilation and heating systems in an industrial manufacturing plant is central to productivity, output and plant productivity measurements. Failure of systems or lack of redundancy of system design is not an option. Deploying systems that are designed to exacting specification, that are built to last, that are reliable and that are easy to service are minimum expectations in the plant production arena. Designers choose quality manufacturers and consider redundancy in their designs to meet the unique demands of these applications. When designing a ventilation and heating system or a heating and ventilation system for your high-bay building, explore the advantages that two different equipment platforms may provide you in the areas of thermal comfort and operating costs (or EE.) Cambridge Engineering, Inc. manufactures both MAU (Make Up Air/Ventilating) and HTHV (High Temperature Heating & Ventilating) types of equipment. While we are most known in the industry for our HTHV heating & ventilation technologies, we have been delivering outstanding product, design service and post installation support within the MAU space for over 15 years. Let us know how we can support you with your system design. Is it a ventilation or heating requirements based system design? Please share your thoughts on your design approach or system considerations as you navigate the nuances of heating and/or ventilating high bay buildings.